Parlay a break from the ski hill into all manner of indoor and outdoor fun. Check out these off-piste, energy-burning, adventures.

Sled and slide

Grab a couple of sleds and head to a local hill. For newbies, hit the mild slope beside Park City Library (1255 Park Ave), also home Lucky Ones Coffee, a convenient hot cocoa warm-up spot. For a bit more speed and air, try Park City Ice Arena (600 Gillmor Way) and slide off the back side of the rink into a soccer field runout; helmets are handy if you’re planning to hit the oft-present jumps. For those willing to work for the downhill, grab a handheld swiss-bob, and hike roughly a mile and 800 feet of vertical up Iron Mountain Trail (mountaintrails.org); slide the entire way down (helmet recommended).

Prefer to be pulled up the hill? Nab a seat on Park City Mountain’s Alpine Coaster (parkcitymountain.com) and control your own speed as you whoop through the track. Or mosey over to Midway’s Soldier Hollow (utaholympiclegacy.org) and allow the conveyer to pull you—and your tube—up to the top of six lanes of downhill sliding. Tips: Book ahead. You can also check out the new Woodward Park City’s tubing hill and more (details on p. 98). Olympic venue Soldier Hollow is also ideal for a Nordic outing (see more cross-country options on p. 76).

Utah Olympic Park’s Discovery Course

Reach new heights

Throw on a harness and hit the ropes courses at Utah Olympic Park (UOP, utaholympiclegacy.org). Start at the Discovery Course beside the Nordic jumps, then work your way up to the Canyon and Summit Courses, both located beside the bobsled track. Winter and spring at the UOP tends to be less crowded in terms of ropes course antics, but team training can be in full-throttle mode, which means you could spy an elite athlete while hanging out 55 feet in the air. Not into ropes courses? Check out the hands-on exhibits at the on-site museums, take a tour, consider splurging on a bobsled ride with a pro (if you’re age 16-plus and have a minute), or plan your trip to coincide with an event—perhaps the IBSF Para Sport World Cup in February. Tips: Call ahead, as the ropes courses are not always open during snowy months (also, check to see if additional activities, such as the Extreme Zipline and Drop Tower, may be up and running); stop by the Visitor Information Center (1794 Olympic Pkwy) to grab a BOGO coupon for the UOP’s Gold Pass; and check the weight requirements for the activities to avoid disappointing little ones. 

A hand-sculpted tunnel at Midway’s Ice Castles

Icy magic

As long as the temperatures are right, the Ice Castles in nearby Midway (Homestead Resort, icecastles.com) provide a fantastical outing from late December through late February. Stroll, crawl, and slip through the 25-million-pound ice edifice, covering roughly an acre with tunnels, slot canyons, thrones, slides, 40-foot spires, and infinite LED-lit icicle wizardry. Tips: Book ahead online, try to hit weekdays to avoid crowds, and wear waterproof pants for exploring the frozen slides and tunnels.

Glide in the Zamboni’s wake at two local rinks: Park City Ice Arena (600 Gillmor Way, 435.615.5707, parkcityice.org; check the website for open skate times) or Resort Center Ice Rink, outdoors at PCM’s base (1415 Lowell Ave, 435.615.8165, parkcityicerink.com). Have your own skates? Head to the pond at Willow Creek Park, and maybe drop in on a hockey game—but check Basin Recreation’s grooming report (basinrecreation.org, under the Trails Report tab) to make sure the ice is solid and cleared first.

New kid on the block

If the 125-acre action sports playground replacing (and expanding) what was once Gorgoza Park is half as cool as its sister POWDR properties, Woodward Park City (3863 Kilby Rd, 435.658.2648, woodwardparkcity.com) is vying to be the top spot as kid, teen, and teen-at-heart heaven. Slated to open this winter, the campus rolls out lift-served skier/snowboarder zones, targeting starter snow bunnies to extreme athletes. And for those lamenting Gorgoza’s passing, there’s a revamped tubing hill, too. Feel like heading indoors? The on-site, 66,000-square-foot facility (well equipped for testing those flips, twists, and beyond) is tricked out with ramps, a trampoline, a foam pit, a spring floor, parkour, and a concrete zone—essentially a skatepark, but for all nonmotorized wheels (think BMX); there’s a pump track, too. Already, plenty of elite athletes have loaned their expertise to the creation—slopestyle fans, don’t miss Red’s Backyard (a Red Gerard-designed park). Oh, and there’s a bar-café on tap for viewing the action, lodge-style eats on the main level, and a digital media lab on the lower level. Though the campus is open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., folks can drop in or stay all day. Tips: Book the two-hour tubing hill or indoor facility passes ahead, snag a day pass, or go all-in for a $100 monthly pass.

Splash

Sometimes the best way to tire out the clan is a day of swimming—yes, even in winter. The South Summit Aquatic Center (350 E 200 South, Kamas, 435.783.2423, ssafc.org), also known as the Kamas Pool, has a massive indoor leisure pool complete with lazy river, two-story tube slide, small slide, and splash features, as well as a lap pool with two diving boards and a climbing wall (open intermittently). Tips: For added indoor fun, the facility’s 33-foot climbing wall (not the more petite poolside one) is open Saturdays. Wrap up the outing with a slice of cheesy pie at Summit Inn Pizza (80 S Main St, Kamas, 435.783.4453, summitinnpizza.com). And don’t show up on Sunday, when the Kamas pool facility is closed.