Tally Stevens of European Marble Tile & Friends says textured, geometric patterns on natural stone and raked tiles that give the effect of grass cloth or wallpaper are trending throughout the home.

Dark, knotty alder cabinets paired with dated, yellow-toned granite counters have left the building. When it comes to modern mountain design, the future is looking light and bright.  Ahead, local experts share the latest and greatest in stone and tile trends for Park City kitchens, bathrooms, fireplaces, and more.

Off the Wall

“We used to see more gray tones, and now we see more natural stones and richly colored, glazed ceramic tiles—think neutral tones like whites, tans, and khakis, but also more vivid colors like merlot and green,” says Tally Stevens of Park City’s new European Marble Tile & Friends (6622 N Landmark Dr, Ste B-160, 435-214-7445, europeanmarbleandgranite.com). He adds that quartzite, marble, granite, and limestone are popular slab and tile surfaces.

As for design details, he’s seeing more pattern play with tiles in bathrooms, including a mix of patterned shower tiles and tub surrounds. He says the use of dimensional, hand-carved tiles by brands like Akdo and Artistic Tile, such as textured, geometric patterns on natural stone and raked tiles that give the effect of grass cloth or wallpaper, are also trending throughout the home.

In Living Color

“We’ve been playing with a lot of color and pattern with tile,” says Brynne Flowers of John Martine studio.

Image: Malissa Mabey

“Terrazzo tile and slabs are having a moment, and have been for a while,” says Brynne Flowers, co-owner of interior design studio John Martine (johnmartine.studio). “We’re seeing more manmade materials—porcelain, quartz, and silestone—offering a wider variety with color and texture.” Flowers prefers this aesthetic to, say, a faux wood tile or a marbled quartz that’s masquerading as something it’s not.

“We’ve also been playing with a lot of color and pattern with tile,” she adds. Case in point: the emerald loo she and design partner Parker Lamborn fashioned for an abode in Alpine, Utah.

“A white marble look will always be in demand as it exudes elegance and beauty,” says Amanda Engle.

White Out

For Park City design duo Stacey Beck and Amanda Engle of Beck & Engle (435-602-9141, beckandengle.com), the forecast calls for snowy hues. “A white marble look will always be in demand as it exudes elegance and beauty,” says Engle. “We inform our clients of the risk and maintenance involved with this type of material, and usually steer them towards a natural quartzite.”

Engle adds that built-up countertops with a square mitered edge are also popular. “What’s great about this type of design is that it can be used in a variety of ways and in varying styles while providing form and function,” she says.

Tile Talk

Salt Lake City-based European Marble & Granite recently opened their second outpost in Park City, European Marble Tile & Friends. Owner Kathleen Fuhriman gave us the scoop on the shiny new showroom.

PCM: What prompted you to open a second showroom?
KF: Park City has always been a huge market for us, and we felt we could offer better service to our existing clients in the area as well as develop new clients in Summit County.

Tally Stevens (sales), Kathleen Fuhriman (owner), and Nichole Stevens (manager) of Park City’s European Marble Tile & Friends

Image: David Newkirk

PCM: What will clients find at the new showroom?
KF: Our showroom is about 1,500 square feet, and we’ve partnered with Il Bagno Plumbing Fixtures and Signature Wood Floors. Our displays show the latest in tile: natural stone, porcelain, ceramic, concrete, mosaics, and other specialty tiles. We also exhibit a good sampling of stone slabs for fabrication and installation.

PCM: What services do you offer?
KF: We are open to the general public as well as to architects, contractors, and the design trade. Nichole Stevens, who manages the Park City showroom, is a talented designer for those who desire design assistance.

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