In Park City, off-leash parks dot the landscape from Old Town to the Basin, making it easy to give your pooch a good workout and a little QT with other canines at the same time. While you’re out there, remember to keep your dog on lead as you enter and exit off-leash areas and parking lots, do bring and use poop bags, and practice 10 seconds of kindness while out on the trail: smile, wave, and say hello.

Off-Leash Parks/Areas

Grab your coffee mug and a Chuckit, and head to the grassy two acres adjacent to the Park City Library, appropriately known as Library Field (1255 Park Ave). Join other fur-parents there in the early morning or later in the evening to hang out in the neighbor-provided lawn chairs (the city is considering installing benches), throw balls for fetch-obsessed pups, and kibitz about town happenings. *Unfenced, no shade, high traffic (lots of dogs)

If there were such a thing as summer day camp for dogs, it would look a lot like the Willow Creek Dog Park (4460 Split Rail Ln), a splashing, fetching, and rough-housing doggie dream come true. The on-site pond has both a dock for jumpers and a zero-entry point for those who like to ease in for a dip. This park also features a 0.3-mile soft surface trail, a 24,000-square-foot fetch space, shaded benches, and an agility course. *Fenced, water, high traffic (lots of dogs)

The big dogs are separated from the small, literally, at Trailside Park (5715 Trailside Dr, just south of the bike park), where one side of this fenced area is for large breeds and the other for the little ones. Benches with shade shelters give owners a little civilized relaxation while their pooches take part in segregated playtime. Walkers can access Trailside’s one-mile off-leash trail from here, too. If you go, be sure to pay attention to the signs identifying areas where dogs must be on leash. *No shade, fenced

The Woods at Parley’s Lane (4275 Sunrise Dr, across Interstate 80 from the Weilenmann School) is a small, grassy half-acre with a few training/exercise features within a fenced area and an open lawn on the other half of the park. Amenities include bathrooms (with a drinking fountain), shaded benches, and a paved parking lot (i.e., no post-romp muddy footprints in your car). *Water, no shade, fenced

Off-Leash Trails

The Run-A-Muk Trail (2387 Olympic Pkwy) is a favorite of both residents in the nearby Bear Hollow condos and staff of Kimball Junction–area dog-friendly workplaces. This rolling, two-mile path meanders through 43 acres of sage-covered hills and an aspen grove below the Utah Olympic Park. The entire area is fenced, so it’s OK to let your pup really stretch her legs and run wild. Note: The parking lot is not paved, so bring a towel during mud season to wipe your dog’s feet before she hops back in your car. *No shade, high traffic (lots of dogs), fenced, beware of wildlife

They don’t call Round Valley Park City’s playground for nothing. You’ll see plenty of other fit pets and their owners hiking or mountain biking here in the summer; Nordic skiing and snowbiking take center stage here in the winter. This sprawling 1,400-acre wonderland boasts 30 miles of trails, best accessed from the Quinn’s Junction trailhead (84098 Gilmor Way), where there’s water and year-round bathrooms. Not all of Round Valley is designated off-leash, however, so please respect the well-marked areas/trails where dogs must be tethered. *Water, no shade, high traffic (lots of dogs), unfenced, beware of wildlife

The usage guidelines were still in the works as of press time, but there’s still hope that at least parts of the high-altitude open space known as Bonanza Flat (accessed, for now, at the top of Guardsman Pass) will remain off-leash-friendly. Bloods Lake has historically been a popular destination for hiking and cooling off with a dog; if you go, be prepared with a leash in case the rules have changed. And don’t forget the poop bags: Bloods Lake is the water supply for the nearby Girl Scout camp. *Water, unfenced, beware of wildlife

 

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